Afternoon Fog

When we arrived home yesterday, my wife cimmediatelty called me to the window. We’ve seen a fare share of fog and haze since we moved here, but somehow, it still grips us like a good horror or better yet, slasher film will. While I’m sure there will come a day when the site at my window or balcony won’t send me diving for the camera will come. I feel somewhat of a reward still feeling that rookie glow. Enjoy it while it lasts.

Neutral Density Filters

With the rainy season upon us and second wave of Covid-19 wrecking havoc on people everywhere. I’ve been trying to find ways to spend my time and stay relatively sane. During the week, I’ve gotten into the habit of working from home, taking much needed breaks and going out on the balcony for a breathe of partially fresh air watch the sun set. In the past, I’d await that moment when the sun descends behind the mountains. Since purchasing a Neutral Density filter, I’m able to capture the look of dusk during the middle of the day. I love how the filter helps smooth out the water while giving my long exposures the contrast I need. It certainly didn’t hurt the the rain that day brought some really nice cloud cover. This was one of my first attempts with Neutral Density Filters and though I have a lot to learn, I love the effects.

Canon D Mark III 200 ISO 30.0 sec f 5.6 with
Cokin NUANCES Extreme Z-Pro Series ND 3.0 Filter (10-Stop)

Photographing Sunsets on TV Mode

Understanding full well that my obsession with running out on the balcony or up to the roof to watch/photograph the sunset each night will eventually fade. I’ve taken to abandoning my camera’s priority mode while switching to manual focus on my lenses. Though manual mode is, by far, the best way to learn. With limited time and a plate of homemade tacos waiting for me on the inside, I switched to TV mode, changing my shutter speed with each image. Those unfamiliar with TV mode allow you to change your camera’s shutter speed and let you play around with the amount of time. Giving you the power to create a sense of motion in your images. Below are a couple of pictures and their settings. As you can see, their taken from very different ends of the spectrum, yet the results are similar.

ISO/100 1/11 seconds at F 32
ISO 800 1/2000 at F 4.5

Smoke on the Water. A.K.A. Haze Part II

As bleak as the haze and smoke of Seattle mornings can be. Knowing full well that there will come a time in the day where the skies will part, and the sun will make an appearance. It’s something that has made living in Seattle a lot easier. Sure, it rains a hell of a lot, but it rarely rains all day. And while this morning, haze or smoke is new, not to mention scary. However ominous, and perhaps part of what’s being termed as “The new normal.” I’ve gotten used to watching as the thick haze disperses, giving was to the sun.
Like clockwork, it happened yesterday. Unfortunately, this time, the haze didn’t lift. It just moved slightly west to Puget Sound. Having never seen such a sight. I grabbed my camera and headed to the roof deck. Below are two of the images I managed to capture.

For my neighbors

As I began to head back down from the roof deck and enjoy the tacos my wife had been preparing. I was greeted by a really kind couple by the bar. After a short chat, I was asked if and where they could see some, if any of the pictures I had just taken. I gave one of them my card in hopes of sharing before I headed downstairs. While there are probably countless people living here, my hopes are to run into them again and possibly lear more from natives of the city I’ve come to call my home. In the meantime, this post and these pictures are for them.