Out with the Old. In with the New.

It happened. I finally move forward and purchased the Canon R6 mirrorless kit which includes a 24-105 F-4 mm lens. At the same time, I traded in two full camera bags of lenses, bodies and accessories. With my wife cheering me on and congratulating .me for lessening the load that has accumulated over the years. The salesperson, Elder, at District Camera was thorough, knowledgable, and above all, patient with my long list of questions. By trading in many items, I felt much lighter, even letting out a long breathe of relief. As we drove home, my wife seemed pleased by my making the jump to mirrorless. She’s always been super positive and supportive of my work, drive, and passion. Something that I’m forever thankful for. Here’s to the learning curve I hope to undergo, and many, many more photography opportunities.

Going Mirrorless

After about a year of grueling research on You Tube and just about every outlet available. I’ve decided to make the move from DSLR to Mirrorless. As someone who’s always been slow when it came to warming up to new technology. It has often taken time and a little push to get on board with the the new flavors of the decade. As someone who went from a film enthusiast to a digital warhorse. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the different stages and steps I’ve made along the way. So, after much thought. I’ll be heading to the local photo warehouse this weekend, to trade in some of my old gear and purchase the Canon Mirrorless R6 kit that includes the 24-105 mm lens. You can expect many images and reportage on the results and overall experience in the mirrorless universe. However, I more than hope to take the time to get to know my cameras settings and whatchacallits. Until then.

Below is a Peter McKinnon (My personal favorite Photographer/Blogger.) video review of the Canon R6.

Unfinished Business.

We recently returned to Pike and Rose in Bethesda to do some shopping and capture those funky stairs with the proper gear. (I don’t consider my phone to be a camera.) After taking my time to capture the flow, I was approached by a security guard who seemed a bit too intrusive as to what I was doing. “I’m doing my thing.” was all I could think of. Which, in the end, seemed good enough.

Stops Along the Way

Taken on a long stretch of road driving through Pennsylvania. Stopping for gas was a good excuse to get out of the car, stretch our legs and take a few pictures. Since I was four, there’s always been an unexplainable fascination with gas stations. Having grown up just blocks from the local airport, there were many available to refuel the countless automobiles traveling to and fro. Shot at 100 ISO to offset the mid day sun. Taking this image rewarded the reason for stopping while making the long ride home more relaxing. It’s always good when a long day ends with some proper documentation.

Fueling Your Art

There are times, like this one, when I might get distracted from what I’m intending to capture, something that is far more appealing to the eyes and creative sense. Such was the case when a soccer team assembled while I was in the midst of framing the planes descending to land at Ronald Reagan International airport. While seeing airplanes up close and personal can be a rush. The formation of enthusiastic athletes grabbed my attention long enough to want to capture their sudden burst of energy. Not wanting to be too intrusive or get hit by an errant soccer ball. I reached into my bag and grabbed my Canon 70-200 focal lens.

Sunrise

I’ve made a lot of positive changes to my life. Starting my day by watching the sun rise before I start my first of two daily workouts is one. Though we haven’t had many sunny mornings in recent weeks, my will to get out and start my day with some fresh air is strong. Here’s to starting the day on a good note.

Remotely Speaking

When we headed out today, I made sure to bring my camera, tripod and recently surfaced remote. Knowing that running errands has become an all day thing for us. I knew that by the time we arrived home, it would be dark. Me being somewhat obsessed with night time photography and how beautiful capturing the available light in the night sky can be. I asked my wife to stop a few feet from the garage and let me do my thing. Both shots were taken at f22 on a 30″ timer. The top image was taken with a 200 ISO.The second (or bottom) image was shot at 100 ISO.

Using Manual Focus

As time goes by, I find myself trying to wane off all automatic features offered on my camera. Shooting on Manual, AV, or TV has been the most rewarding educational experience I’ve had as a photographer. It’s helped me improve my composition skills while giving me complete control of my creativity. Manual focus, however, seems to have become my Achilles heel, especially, and almost exclusively, when it comes to night and low light settings. My focus here was the far-off Queen Anne Cell Towers, which have been an image I’ve attempted to take for some time now. At the same time, my attempts have rendered results both good and bad. It’s the sharpness of my manual focus that always seems to be the judge.
Looking at the shot below and being reminded that it was taken without the balance of my tripod makes me appreciate my growing sense of patience. I wholeheartedly recommend learning all the options your camera offers. Using those tools and getting off manual modes with not only help you grow as a photographer. It will also help you create your unique vision.

Seattle Night Photography

From afar Seattle is a beautiful city with a skyline to match. When we come upon the south or north side of the city, there’s always that feeling that we’ll be home soon. No matter the direction we’re coming from, there’s always the urge to take a detour, stop, and take a few pictures of the sunset or the onset of dusk. I’ve often found myself testing my wife’s patience with my child like excitement. I took these one night on our way home from Tacoma. Thanks to my wife for not leaving me on the side of the road.

The Kind of Pictures You Always Wanted to Take.

Aside from music, photography has been the longest and most constant passion in my life. Over more than thirty years, countless rolls of film, and thousand and thousands of digital images, I’ve learned and decided that in the end, less is more. Instead of taking and keeping a million images I might like or look back on with lessened enthusiasm. I’d instead take, save and share the ones I carefully composed and maybe planned. Learning to shoot on manual and TV modes while arranging and carefully composing my shots has given me the knowledge and the ability to take the kind of pictures I want. Proving that you’re never too old to learn new things, and there’s always plenty of room for improvement. Therefore, keep shooting, keep learning, and aspire to shoot the pictures you always wanted to.