Finding Time for what’s Important

I love Seattle, living in Columbia City, our apartment, our neighbors and living within spitting distance of Columbia Park, the Public Library and Seattle Lake. Each of which I don’t take for granted,  but don’t take advantage of nearly as much as I should. As I’ve grown to understand and embrace the importance of time, how it’s spent and how to make the most of what we have. I’m finding more focus and a new found ability to properly manage it. As someone who’s dealt with anxiety, panic attacks and depression over the years. I’ve done more than  my share of worrying and overthinking. Thankfully though, I’ve learned and I’m still learning how to manage if not control my thoughts. Putting things in perspective, as opposed to letting them build up and let them effect me in a negative way. I feel that in changing my environment, I became more open to shifting the way I see things. Something I see as a major positive. The pictures below were taken over the weekend at nearby Lake Washington.

Geek-2

Lake-1

Geek-1

Geek-3

 

Photographic Therapy

Everyone has certain hours of the day when they are at their sharpest and most productive. Where each task is taken on with Herculean strength and Buddha like wisdom. Where checklists are quickly checked and the “To Do” lists are wistfully filed in the  “Already Does” box. For me personally, that time is between 4:00pm and 2:00am. The hours between 11:00am and 2:00pm however are awash in what I refer to as the ADHD Double D’s. During that time of day my mind often races and  I have absolutely no focus. It’s so bad at times I could honestly punch myself in the head. I had pretty much surrendered to the fact  that little will be done during these hours. That was until last week.

I decided to try something new and book some photo sessions and band interviews during the peak time when I have the worst concentration. The thought was that by concentrating on one thing and one thing only for that period of time I would be able to regain the attention lost when trying aimlessly to attack numerous projects. I did a couple of studio sessions and sat down for an interview with a local musician. My focus and attention to detail were sharp as a tack. I addressed a couple of studio gaffs, fixing them quickly and even got some great answers from my musician friend, despite my rambling questions. Personally, I think tackling something that has become a major issue in my life is of the utmost importance. Being able to start my afternoons on such a high creative plain is extremely rewarding and paramount for getting the most out of the rest of the day.

Thanks Rosie.

As we sat and chatted over Summer Rolls and Rice vermicelli Rosie asked me “What do you want to do?” We had been talking about photography and marketing our work. Something I have forever struggled with. Her question was a good one and hit me like a bullet. I’ve been asked that question countless times since before I can remember.  I can recall my Mother relentlessly asking me what I was going to do with the rest of my life since my Freshman year of High School.                            (Can you imagine the pressure?) Her question, as much as it may have rattled me was a very good one. As much as I want to emerse myself in every aspect of photography. I do need to focus on my strengths. As much as I love the idea of keeping myself busy with weddings, babies, travel and every other thing there is to photograph and inspire me. Portraiture is what I’m best at and what inspires me most. It’s where I feel I am at my very best. That’s not to say I don’t want or won’t do those other things. Just to focus on my strengths. Thanks Rosie. You finally got me to focus. Now if you can only get me to stop talking with my mouth full.