Our Time in Seattle is Coming to an End.

After four years in Seattle, we’ve decided to head back east. Despite the adventure and the fact that we bought a home here. We decided to move to Washington, DC. The draw of going back east to be close, but not that close, to family and friends, is undeniable. As someone inspired by the music from the area at a young age, music also influenced my sociopolitical views. The opportunity to live in a culture that had and still has such a profound effect on me is exciting and compelling. Since our decision, we’ve made a point of visiting the areas, restaurants, record and book stores we’ve enjoyed the most during our time here. One of the spots I’ll miss most is Belltown Barbers. Dave and CoCo have provided me with the best cuts and the best gab sessions anyone could ever ask for during my four years here. I hope and plan to keep in touch with them. Only time will tell. Regardless, by Saturday, I’ll be having breakfast at DC’s Waffle House and exploring the area’s record stores.st.

Left to Right; Dave, Me, CoCo.

Last Words and their Indelible Impact.

I was living in Midtown Manhattan when my grandmother was hospitalized. The smart as whip, quick witted person I had known my whole life was quickly fading. and though I could not accept it at the time., was not returning home or even graduating to one of those old age homes that, at the time, had only seen in movies and on TV. With trips from the Broadway office where I worked quickly becoming a challenge. I decided to stay with my Dad in Staten Island, just blocks away from the hospital she had been admitted to.

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One weekend morning.as I held her fragile hand in mine. She turned to me and in a weakened voice inquiring about an incident I hadn’t thought of in close to twenty years. Referring to a second grade incident that I took the blame for but never played any part in or even witness. “Why did you throw that girl’s snow boots out the window?” Those words, the last she would utter before passing away served as a heavy burden I still carry today. Of all the things I did. The bloody noses and black eyes I gave out to those who came to me looking for a fight. The times I mouthed off to teachers or questioned the religious dogma we were being force fed. The one she took to the grave was the crime I never committed.

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While I still look back, dream and write about my childhood and growing up. Rarely do my dreams include the angel who played a pivotal role in my growing up and becoming a man. The few times she’s showed up in my dreams, her role mirrors that of her real life presence. Through thick and thin, my grandmother was always that of a care giver and a peace maker. Whereas she always comes up in conversation with my Dad and Step Mom. I often feel that I never had a chance to thank her for her infinite kindness, hard work and guidance. I promise to always be grateful and appreciative. Oh, and just a reminder. I never touched her boots.

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