… And so it Begins

Thanks to the to the advice and guidance of a friend and gifted artist, I’ve decided to embark on selling prints of some of the many images I’ve shot over the years. Though still very much in the idea stage. I’ve begun to reach back to some old favorites, look into possible places to print and the right website to host my images. I hope to start small with just a few images, ones picked with the customer in mind. (Not necessarily my favorites, but ones that might appeal to a broader audience, while still reflecting my overall style. Below is an image taken back in the early nineties with a Nikon EM film camera and 50 mm lens. Special thanks to Jenn for the inspiration. You can buy her prints here. It Does Art

Liberty II-1.jpg

Interpreting Art. (For Jenn)

Recently I was asked a very tough question from a friend and fellow artist in regard to some images I had posted from my trip to Mana Contemporary’s open house studio tour. The question “How do you go about photographing someone else’s art?” was about as good as question as they come. The fact that it was coming from an artist I respect and love gave the inquiry weight and importance that deserved a thoughtful answer. Photographing another artists passion and hard work may not be as easy as it sounds. From my early dayArt and the way we interprit it.s in the late 90’s photographing paintings and sculptures for Cooper Union students on the streets and rooftops of the east village and the lower east side of NYC.   I’ve always made it a point to portray the artists vision without giving it the look and feel of a carbon copy office memo.            I’ve found that lighting, contrast shadow and unique angles all add to the depth and personality of the chosen piece. As a documentarian, adding my own understanding, perception and appreciation of the piece helped warrant such intrusion. Photographing another artists passion and hard work may not be as easy as it sounds.

From my early days in the late 90’s photographing paintings and sculptures for Cooper Union students on the streets and rooftops of the east village and the lower east side of NYC.     I’ve always made it a point to portray the artists vision without giving it the look and feel of a carbon copy office memo.            I’ve found that lighting, contrast shadow and unique angles all add to the depth and personality of the chosen piece.             As somewhat of a documentarian, adding my own understanding, perception and appreciation of the piece helped warrant such intrusion. Thanks for the thoughtful question Jenn. You are an inspiration.

To check out Jenn’s work. Click the link below.

It Does Art